“End of the Line” concept art update #3-ish

Right. So. Trevor Smith and I came to the conclusion that the original cover idea gave away too much, so he’s back at the drawing board. However, we both loved what he’d drawn before scrapping the idea, and Trevor has decided to keep working on it to add to his portfolio.

The new cover will have Terran Marines in their CR-31 combat fighting suit, probably blasting the bad aliens and such. In the meantime, here’s some more of the original art that won’t be on the cover (however, I might go ahead and purchase it as an alternative cover for the paperbacks, because it is pretty damn awesome).

More concept art from Trevor Smith for "End of the Line."

More concept art from Trevor Smith for “End of the Line.”

Fermi Paradox: Why haven’t we encountered life beyond Earth?

Just read a really interesting article about why humans have yet to encounter any life beyond our home planet: Fermi Paradox

“A really starry sky seems vast—but all we’re looking at is our very local neighborhood. On the very best nights, we can see up to about 2,500 stars (roughly one hundred-millionth of the stars in our galaxy), and almost all of them are less than 1,000 light years away from us (or 1% of the diameter of the Milky Way). “

…..

“When confronted with the topic of stars and galaxies, a question that tantalizes most humans is, “Is there other intelligent life out there?” Let’s put some numbers to it (if you don’t like numbers, just read the bold)—

As many stars as there are in our galaxy (100 – 400 billion), there are roughly an equal number of galaxies in the observable universe—so for every star in the colossal Milky Way, there’s a whole galaxy out there. All together, that comes out to the typically quoted range of between 1022 and 1024 total stars, which means that for every grain of sand on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

The science world isn’t in total agreement about what percentage of those stars are “sun-like” (similar in size, temperature, and luminosity)—opinions typically range from 5% to 20%. Going with the most conservative side of that (5%), and the lower end for the number of total stars (1022), gives us 500 quintillion, or 500 billion billion sun-like stars.”

Read the rest here: Fermi Paradox